REGGIE WILSON/FIST & HEEL PERFORMANCE GROUP

Windy City Times preview/Reggie Wilson: ‘DANCIN’ FEATS A kinesthetic anthropologist and his movement specialists’

‘The predominant theme examined in this work centers around questions of “belonging” with the promotional tagline asking, “What does it mean to belong?” and “What does it mean NOT to want to belong?” Although this line of questioning is intentionally provocative and specific, focusing on these questions as a way to decipher the meaning of the dance would be an unnecessary over-simplification. Instead, Wilson would rather audiences show up and let the dance speak for itself on its own terms.’ Read the full preview here.

Alameda Magazine / Reggie Wilson preview: ‘Dancers who sing, talk and chant’

‘While he has made his reputation with exquisitely shaped work that is rooted in traditional stories and myths, Wilson’s choreography is eminently eclectic and inclusive. It is formally elegant yet embracing. His dancers are as likely to engage in canons as, apparently, racing for a bus. Not only are these performers superb movers, they sing, they talk, they chant.’

Read the full preview here.

Reggie Wilson/preview: ‘Let my people go in dance’

‘The African American choreographer Reggie Wilson never seems satisfied with one idea or theme in his work. His dance Moses(es), performed Sept. 23 and 24 at Zellerbach Hall, is about the African diaspora, with music based on clapping and chants developed by Wilson and his collaborators. But it’s also an exploration of ideas about the biblical prophet Wilson explored during trips he took to Israel, Turkey, Egypt and Mali, and the urge to dramatize Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Moses, Man of the Mountain, which sets the story in the African American experience.’

Read the full preview here.

Broadway World Preview: ‘Reggie Wilson/Fist and Heel Performance Group to Return to The Dance Center This Fall’

‘Choreographer Wilson’s new work CITIZENquestions what it means to belong and what it means to not want to belong, inspired by the histories of iconic African Americans who faced prevalent contradictions and irony connected to individuality, anonymity, freedom and dignity in relation to their civic duties. A provocative dialogue emerges through a series of five intricately woven solos, layered with haunting footage that suspends time and placE. Wilson, whose postmodern work embodies elements of blues, folk and African Diaspora cultures, works down to the marrow in CITIZEN, exposing isolation and the ways in which we make space for our communities and our countries without sacrificing the authentic sense of self and the legacies of our diverse cultural identities.’

Read the full preview here.

This Fall, Visit Lotus at Arts Midwest (booth #527B ), WAA (booth #318 ), and PAE (booth #708 )

Reggie Wilson/Fist & Heel Performance Group dancers Yeman Brown and Anna Schön nominated for a BESSIE

Congratulations to Reggie Wilson Fhpg’s dancers Yeman Brown and Anna Schön Levy on their nomination for a BESSIE for their stunning performance in ‘CITIZEN’.

West Palm Beach Review: ‘Dancers brilliantly explore extremes in Wilson’s ‘Citizen’’

‘Brooklyn-based choreographer Reggie Wilson is brilliant. The Fist and Heel Performance Group dancers who perform and collaborate in his work are brilliant, and the work he creates is wonderfully, difficultly, brilliant.’

Read the full review here.

Reggie Wilson/Fist & Heel Performance Group to perform ‘CITIZEN’ at Columbia College’s Dance Center

Read the Chicago Tribune article here.

Reggie WILSON/FIST & HEEL PERFORMANCE GROUP TO PERFORM ‘MOSES(ES)’ AT CAL PERFORMANCES THIS FALL

See Cal Performances’ season announcement here.

Miami Herald: ‘Choreographers use dance to express messages about citizenship, identity’

‘Dance has often been used as a medium to criticize current society or to ask questions. In today’s world rife with racial tensions and immigration issues, choreographer Reggie Wilson’s latest work, “CITIZEN,” asks the question, “What does it mean to belong?”

At a panel discussion April 22 at HistoryMiami Museum, Wilson said identity could mean belonging to one racial or religious group or using one preferred pronoun or another. He told 30 attendees how he uses dance to address the issues of belonging, relying on body movement and sequences instead of using words to express his message.’

Read the full article here.